INSECT listed as prohibited item by Queensland Government

INSECT listed as prohibited item by Queensland Government

Queensland G20 (Safety and Security) Bill 2013 and new Police Powers

The G20 (Safety and Security) Bill, 2013 which is now before Queensland State Parliament has attracted the attention of civil society advocates and the Law Society.

The Bill provides for the establishment of inner and outer-city security zones and “restriction zones” covering venues for meetings, accommodation, and access roads for the safe movement of the Leaders’ motorcade during the November 2014 Heads of State/Government meeting in Brisbane and the Finance Ministers’ meeting in Cairns in September, 2014.

Under the new Bill, Police would have increased security powers to arrest and detain members of the public without bail for at least the week of the G20 Summit.

The legislation makes it an offence to be in possession of prohibited items including eggs, canned goods, hand tools, glass bottles, surfboards, model cars, model aircraft, banners exceeding 1m x 2m, reptiles, insects and a number of other items that can be used as “projectiles” even if they have an ordinary every-day use.  A full list of prohibited items (Schedule 6 to the Bill) can be found at

https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/Bills/54PDF/2013/G20SafetySecurityB13.pdf

The Bill also allows Police to publish the names and photographs of anyone who is prohibited from entering the inner-city security zone.

The Explanatory Notes published by the Queensland Parliament note that many of the “provisions of the Bill are not consistent with fundamental legislative principals” including the presumption against bail, warrantless searches, searches of premises and general restrictions on the normal activities of community members for the duration of the Summit.

Many would question whether providing these types of powers to our Police force is excessive.  It is important to note that whilst a person may be questioned by Police there are circumstances in which a person may refuse to answer questions of the Police….It is always best to seek legal advice before undergoing a formal Police interview.  If you would like further information or you need assistance, call Sarah Brazel on 43247699.

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